Using loader.io to test the cloud


 

When things are going well we often forget about infrastructure, maintenance, scaling and risk; this is especially when your servers are sitting somewhere in the cloud and that they will “scale” somewhat “automatically” when the services detect that your application needs more resources… Unless you have chaos monkey to keep you on your feet, you are going to have to revisit the past yourself once in a while..

I have been meaning to take a look at what we put together for blanklabel back in 2010 only because I know that there is still a lot more work to be done… but preparing load tests that hit various aspects of the infrastructure is time consuming… you have to capture the flow making sure that you hit the web, database, code, bandwidth and cdn resources where each might already be further cloudified and highly available.

I play with shiny toys every now and then, and recently my shiny toy is loader.io; while blanklabel has been using sendgrid for sending its order confirmation emails since 2010 to users (who eagerly await them). So, what did I gain from using loader.io today? Compared to the other day where I had no problems with a 10k hit (vising 1 static URL); today I tried to hit it with 50k hits, 3 heavy urls per connection… and below are the results.
CloudFail

 

Yes, the test server (I didn’t run this against production) failed at some point and it stopped responding; but its not as simple as that; the infrastructure did not actually fail; the reason why there were timeouts and 500’s were because the worker process got stuck… which means that there is some bad code that can cause a bottleneck before the infrastructure fails, or successfully adjusts resources. Since I had repeated 10k tests a few times before trying a 50k test, its also possible that the cloud admin had already blocked or killed the incoming request which would have impacted my testing… but why leave it open as a risk? n addition to doing a code review, I need to target the workflow correctly; it is quite possible that I did not set things up correctly in the first place.

If you have not checked out loader.io, you should! for me there is a long road that awaits with lots of things to be learnt (and improved).

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